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Highlander 2: The Quickening (1991)

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NOTE: This commentary is only available on the "Renegade Version" DVD release; the more recent "Special Edition" does not have a commentary track.

Commentaries on this disc:

Commentary 1: Director Russell Mulcahy and producers William N. Panzer and Peter S. Davis Rating:6.0/10 (1 vote) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by Pineapples101 on September 11th, 2012:Find all reviews by Pineapples101
Not quite as interesting as the Highlander commentary. I always wondered if both the Highlander and Highlander II commentaries were recorded back to back in one session, and if this would account for the lack of enthusiasm on this track as opposed to the Highlander track. Or maybe it's just the obvious disappointment shared by the commentators that even the re-cut Renegade cut is still not what Mulcahy originally envisioned.

Either way, there is a lot of fascinating information to be had here. The biggest and most obvious thing to be learned here is that the decision to film in Argentina must have been the single most idiotic idea in the history of film making since John Landis said "move the helicopter lower!".

It just confirms my suspicions that Davis and Panzer are indeed the worst producers since the Salkinds. Putting aside the questionable plot - trying to save money by moving a film production to a country that had little to no film making experience or film studio infrastructure, coupled with the fact that Argentina had recently been at war with Britain... seemed to completely blow up in the producers faces. Resulting in the insurance companies stepping in to pretty much take over the film and finally produce their own cut.

I wasn't involved in the production of the film, but it seems obvious after listening to the commentary, watching all the making of documentaries, reading multiple interviews etc etc that Davis and Panzer should be help ultimately responsible for the utter disaster that is Highlander II's production. It's a true credit to Mulcahy that he doesn't hold a grudge and never openly criticized anyone.

A good commentary for anyone interested in film productions gone wrong. My only annoyance is that the producers never fully accept responsibility.