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Zodiac (2007)

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NOTE: These commentaries are not available on releases prior to the January 2008 2-disc Director's Cut DVD. They are available on the Blu-Ray release.

Commentaries on this disc:

Commentary 1: Director David Fincher Rating:8.2/10 (28 votes) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by The Cubist on January 8th, 2008:Find all reviews by The Cubist
He touches upon the “oddly personal” period details as much of the film takes place during his childhood and around areas he lived. This also informed the period songs he picked for the film. Fincher wasn’t interested in doing another serial killer film and sees this one as a newspaper movie about the men who investigate the murders. He points out where they diverged from the facts for reasons of pacing and to move the story along. Not surprisingly, he tends to focus on the filmmaking side of things. This is the kind of engaging, informative track we’ve come to expect from Fincher.
Reviewed by reidca on July 21st, 2008:Find all reviews by reidca
This is probably my favorite Fincher track (not to diss the others though!). There's something about his voice that is warm yet commanding, intellectual but never egotistical (take that! Jim Cameron) and the way he effortlessly combines factoids and anecdotes with humour and asides while crediting Jennifer Aniston for casting Jake and Mark and talks about Dermot Mulroney's inspiring basement. He's sound incredibly prepared and I don't know how he talked non-stop for 2.5 hours (there's rarely a pause) yet it all seems off the cuff as though he really does have a brain that big. His constant revelations that he kept re-doing scenes are, well, revelatory, as are the facts that much of period San Francisco are digital matte paintings (only been there once, in the seventies no less!). Highly Recommended.
Reviewed by Buldrebisk on August 26th, 2008:Find all reviews by Buldrebisk
David Fincher usually gives informative and engaging commentaries. But somehow I find them a little boring in places. Even though he talks for the entire film, his comments more often than I like (and expect) comes in the category of; "That's a great line", or "I like the look he gives". He has some very interesting moments and stories, but those are good chunks spread apart with this kind of filler material describing what he sees on the screen. I think I might have too high expectiations for mr. Fincher and those where not quite met with this commentary. I also felt he was a little disengaged here with a very monotone voice with little enthusiasm.

Usually I grade a commentary from a 0 and hear what they have to say and give them what they deserve. But with someone like Fincher I expect a high remark and find things that pull the grade down. I really wanted this to be great. It's good, but I it's nowhere near as engaging as the documentaries on the second disc which contains a lot of talking heads with more interesting things to say than Fincher. This is a good commentary, but I wanted it to be more. 7/10
Reviewed by Thames Ironworks on March 29th, 2009:Find all reviews by Thames Ironworks
From the second it starts, Fincher is off! Stories and anecdotes and a really intense examination of everything on screen. Very good commentary!
Reviewed by Bickle, T. on May 9th, 2009:Find all reviews by Bickle, T.
It’s always a good thing when a particular track makes you appreciate a great film that much more. You’ll never be bored.
Reviewed by ode on December 20th, 2010:Find all reviews by ode
I was a little disappointed in this track.

From other reviews I was led to believe it was more informative than it turned out to be.

It's not bad or boring, just slow and not all that interesting. You can safely skip it if you wish.
Reviewed by sedna on August 12th, 2013:Find all reviews by sedna
I have to agree with "ode". Praise for this track is slightly misleading. Fincher has recorded MUCH better tracks in the past. One of them was actually for Panic Room which was entirely filled with all sorts of technical and cinematic information. He has also divulged great insight on The Game and Se7en's tracks. This track has a few bits and pieces pertaining to choices made in the film that were interesting and illuminating but very few and quite sparse throughout the film. If you are a completist then check it out.
Reviewed by Pineapples101 on January 28th, 2016:Find all reviews by Pineapples101
This is my favourite Fincher film to date (as of 2016) and a subject I find fascinating, so I probably rate this track a bit higher than others.
Also, I'll admit that I'm a bit obsessed with Fincher, so any insights into his past, in this case his childhood in San-Francisco is of great interest to me.
A good solid track that works are a great accompaniment to a great film.
Commentary 2: Actors Jake Gyllenhall and Robert Downey Jr, producer Brad Fischer, screenwriter James Vanderbilt and writer James Ellroy Rating:8.2/10 (20 votes) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by The Cubist on January 8th, 2008:Find all reviews by The Cubist
Fischer and Vanderbilt talk about how closely they stuck to the actual facts of the case and delve into its details. Ellroy, a self-proclaimed fan of the film, does his entertaining Demon Dog of crime fiction persona that fans of his love while also talking about the film’s place in crime fiction. Downey and Gyllenhaal provide all kinds of anecdotal information with Downey displaying his trademark dry sense of humour. The Ellroy/Fischer/Vanderbilt portion compliments the Downey/Gyllenhaal one in this equally entertaining and very informative track.
Reviewed by Buldrebisk on September 5th, 2008:Find all reviews by Buldrebisk
I actually liked this commentary better than Finchers. The tone of the entire commentary was lighter and obviously from a different point of view to the movie. While Fincher talked alot about the film making aspect of it all, here the two teams of commentators seem more free and therefore a little more entertaining. The chemistry between the people talking is great, especially the Downey and Gyllenhaal team. The two tracks are edited so you get a couple of minutes of team one, and then like ten minutes of team two and vice versa. Very good and enjoyable commentary that filled the almost three hour running time. 8/10
Reviewed by ode on June 29th, 2010:Find all reviews by ode
Fischer and Vanderbilt offer small details that add to the experience of watching the movie. Ellroy comes across as pretty gross with his eagerness to go the lowest level.

Downey and Gyllenhaal offer little. Downey is fine, being dry and funny, but doesn't bring that much to the table in terms of anecdotes. I found Gyllenhaal even more annoying than Ellroy. He comes across as whiny, juvenile and vacuous.
Reviewed by ode on June 29th, 2010:Find all reviews by ode
Fischer and Vanderbilt offer small details that add to the experience of watching the movie. Ellroy comes across as pretty gross with his eagerness to go the lowest level.

Downey and Gyllenhaal offer little. Downey is fine, being dry and funny, but doesn't bring that much to the table in terms of anecdotes. I found Gyllenhaal even more annoying than Ellroy. He comes across as whiny, juvenile and vacuous.
Reviewed by reidca on March 17th, 2013:Find all reviews by reidca
Ellroy has some very honest things to say but he sounds like he has a great respect for the final film and is able to relate it back to his own life in very funny and profound ways. I'm also impressed with how Mr. Ellroy swears. When I grow up I to be able to swear just like Mr. Ellroy.