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Blade Runner (1982)

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NOTE: These commentaries are only available on the December 2007 "Final Cut" of Blade Runner. This version is available in the two-disc Final Cut "Special Edition," the four-disc "Collector's Edition," the five-disc "Complete Collector's Edition," and the five-disc "Ultimate Collector's Edition." Other DVD releases of Blade Runner do not have a commentary track.

Commentaries on this disc:

Commentary 1: Director Ridley Scott Rating:8.2/10 (37 votes) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by zombking on January 16th, 2008:Find all reviews by zombking
Though one might expect Scott to add a whole new dimension to the film, don't expect anything amazing. Though it's far better than some of the more boring commentaries out there, Scott can't really add to all that we know (which is a lot) about the legend of Blade Runner. It's worth the listen, but don't expect to have any new doors open up.
Reviewed by reidca on March 1st, 2008:Find all reviews by reidca
Generally this is a typically good commentary from Sir Ridley. He doesn't really repeat himself, never narrates the action and is always interesting to listen to. He provides a nice balance of the technical and more conceptual aspects to the film and I was surprised that even after the hours upon hours of extra features on the box set Scott was able to add much additional information: comparing the narration to the superior work in Apocalypse Now, the practicalities of re-using the same sets and decorations over and over, using Vic Armstrong to double for Harrison, Harrison's Jerry Lewis voice which came from an unidentified Bogart film, how they did the replicant's red eyes, his unhappiness with the love scene and discusses why he likes the anamorphic format.

He even digresses and talks about other films of his, such as Alien, Gladiator and American Gangster.

I think anyone who has listened to a few Scott commentaries knows he has a very specific, intelligent and entertaining style, right?
Reviewed by sillybilly on May 19th, 2008:Find all reviews by sillybilly
Ridley always does a good commentary, and this lives up to his standard. Lots of information, behind the scenes stories, it's just great fun to listen to. He talks casually and honestly, and bearly pauses for breath. Recommended!
Reviewed by stuartbannerman on May 28th, 2009:Find all reviews by stuartbannerman
Without the 4 hour doc 'Dangerous Days', without the impressive making of book that came out a few years ago and without the legendary stories of Blade Runner, without those then this commentary would have been fantastic. Its still a very good commentary but we know too much about the film to be wowoed by anything Ridley says and thats not his fault.
Taken on its own merits then this is a great commentery in the way Ridley does them. He is always worth listening to and always gives us at least some information that we didnt know in the first place.
Long may he continue to chat track.
Reviewed by sedna on September 25th, 2012:Find all reviews by sedna
Decent commentary. So let's get to it. Ridley talks about; effectiveness of narration, director decisions, inspirations for the look, shooting logistics with miniature, production design, experience of doing ads, little tidbits of how certain shots were achieved such as the retina reflection on Rachel, and the Owl. MTV as inspiration, importance of sound, taking time with storytelling to make an impact, lights, anamorphic. I mean you get a nice range of interesting things. Informative
Reviewed by Agressor on June 26th, 2016:Find all reviews by Agressor
I agree with what most reviewers have stated about Ridley covering a lot of topics and keeping up a good pace in this commentary track. There is really not much to complain about, but if I were to nitpick, he digresses quite a bit. Not always to the detriment of the commentary, his musings can be both amusing and intruiging, but there are also occasions where his ruminations results in self-indulgent tripe. But he is an opiniated fella, for sure, and I would'nt want it any other way. So I can accept some indulgence in an otherwise fine commentary.
Commentary 2: Executive producer/co-screenwriter Hampton Fancher, co-screenwriter David Peoples, producer Michael Deely, and production executive Katherine Haber Rating:7.6/10 (12 votes) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by zombking on January 20th, 2008:Find all reviews by zombking
By far this is one of the more awkward commentaries I have ever heard. Strangely enough, the producers here offer the most interesting information (one interesting note is that almost all of these BR commentaries include something about the Bradbury building being trashed up, with different stories from each one, such as it being easy or tiresome or stressful or annoying, depending on who you hear) as compared to the writers, who have this odd chemistry that is awkward at best and antagonistic at worst. These two writers (one rewrote the other's script, and so they try desperately to pretend as thought they were really collaborating and working together) argue about who wrote what, and can't really remember anything about the film. The original writer claims he didn't even like the PKD book and just thought it would make a decent flick, and the other cusses a lot and by the end just says things like "you don't even remember your own damn script," followed by an awkward laugh from both.

Though this offers some interesting tidbits, it also proves that these extemporaneous commentaries often go awry and can get uncomfortable very quickly. Only for the die-hard BR commentary fan.
Reviewed by Therealmrspock on August 15th, 2016:Find all reviews by Therealmrspock
It's great that this DVD has three different commentaries, which allows for three different takes on the film. Mead, Paull, Snyder, Trumbull and Yuricich give a good contribution, no pauses (thankfully) and pleanty of information. Unfortunately, they talk too much only about production design, and rarely address events on the screen. Some of the trivia bits are very interesting, though (i.e. Harrison Ford was a carpenter and thus changed some of the sets, which caused one art director to resign; when Ford made a "video-phone" conversation, apparently it was a live recording with the girl just ten feet away behind the camera's view; the final showdown on the roof took a full 36 consecutive hours (!) to film, which caused one crew member to almost collapse from exhaustion...) and they finally say the obvious, namely congratulate Ford for one of his best performances ever, with which I fully agree. I guess it is more fun for people interested in set-design - but for the rest, it is good, though somewhat dry.
Commentary 3: "Visual futurist" Syd Mead, production designer Lawrence G. Paull, art director David L. Snyder, and special photographic effects supervisors Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich, and David Dryer Rating:7.9/10 (16 votes) [graph]Login to vote or review
Reviewed by reidca on May 16th, 2008:Find all reviews by reidca
Surprisingly, I think this is my favorite commentary on this set and for once I thank god that they didn't edit the three tracks together. Everyone is quite honest and up front about the differences between crew and Ridley and there is a level of nitty gritty detail (especially fron the art department people) that is missing from the other two commentaries. If you're a fan, it's a must listen.
Reviewed by reidca on June 4th, 2008:Find all reviews by reidca
This is actually a review for Paul Sammon's commentary on the Blade Runner workrpint available on the Blade Runner 5 disc set!!

As you would expect from the definitive documentarian for this film (hew was on set for Cinefantastique magazine and wrote the book, Future Noir - The Making Of Blade Runner) this track is chock full of info with nary a pause - Sammon alternates between differences this version and others (being the theatrical, international video, director's cut and final cut), details regarding the film and the shooting (much of which would come from his book) and his own personal views on certain scenes and moments. My complaint is that he hadn't seen the Final Cut when he recorded it so any comments regarding it cannot be 100% accurate. A must listen for fans though.
Reviewed by Therealmrspock on August 15th, 2016:Find all reviews by Therealmrspock
It's great that this DVD has three different commentaries, which allows for three different takes on the film. Mead, Paull, Snyder, Trumbull and Yuricich give a good contribution, no pauses (thankfully) and pleanty of information. Unfortunately, they talk too much only about production design, and rarely address events on the screen. Some of the trivia bits are very interesting, though (i.e. Harrison Ford was a carpenter and thus changed some of the sets, which caused one art director to resign; when Ford made a "video-phone" conversation, apparently it was a live recording with the girl just ten feet away behind the camera's view; the final showdown on the roof took a full 36 consecutive hours (!) to film, which caused one crew member to almost collapse from exhaustion...) and they finally say the obvious, namely congratulate Ford for one of his best performances ever, with which I fully agree. I guess it is more fun for people interested in set-design - but for the rest, it is good, though somewhat dry.